Libre Baskerville is a classic font with a modern twist. It's easy to read on screens of every shape and size, and perfect for long blocks of text.

A friend of mine once told me that there are no new stories, that they have all already been told, and that they are merely retold again and again using different words and from a different perspective. I found her statement to be unsettling, for if humanity is not creating new stories, then perhaps, we have ceased to evolve.

    And so, as lofty a goal as it may seem, I set out to tell a new story, and wrote a strange tale which utilizes the fundamentals of human nature as its personal playground. 'An Unlikely Messiah' is its title, and the first two chapters are available to read by clicking the blog link. The book is dedicated to thought, and so thought it attempts to evoke, with words pulled as threads from humanity’s spirit, it presents side by side events depraved and ugly but also events compassionate and beautiful. Those threads are left to flutter about freely though, for they are not mine to weave into some sort of tapestry, they are but raw material for the reader to make of them what they will.

    I wrote ‘An Unlikely Messiah’ to be entertaining, because a story must first be that before it can be anything else, but I had a hope while I wrote the book, I hoped it could serve as a sort of a primer, an initial foray into experiencing thought without bias. I’ll not say here how I thought a fictional tale could induce such a state in a person, as that would defeat its purpose, but I did hope that if one were to read the book, they might then be open to thoughts about humanity’s trial that are somewhat different. ‘An Unlikely Messiah’ is available at Amazon, and now, on to other things.

 

This will be a collection of essays that I continually add to, so if you enjoy what you read, check back now and then for new material. I’ll write about the things that are important to the American people, but that are also applicable to all people, because after all, we are all human.

    We seem to live in chaotic times, a time of divisiveness and disillusionment, that is a problem, and although to me it is a problem almost laughably simple in its resolution, it is one which may not be addressed until something else has been taken care of. And so, I present to you my opening essay,

 

It Wasn’t White People

It wasn’t white people that enslaved black people, nor was it white people that subjugated American Indians. Sure, the people responsible for those injustices were of a light complexion, but the bottom line is that they were only people doing what people do. It is a sad fact of human nature that people are only too willing to subject other people to whatever horrors they deem necessary to get what they want. Slavery, subjugation, even genocide have been common practices throughout history, and all cultures, or at least factions of cultures, have been guilty of them. Long before humans became capable of far ranging travel, white people preyed on white people in Europe, Africans preyed on Africans, peoples native to North America preyed on each other, and the list could go on to cover every ethnic group on the planet.

    If in history, there had never been any ethnic groups, if everybody had been of the same ethnicity, either all white, all black, all indigenous Americans, all Asian, all Pacific Islander, all whatever, history would still read the same, it would chronicle a human history of slavery, subjugation, and genocide. Know too, that in America, such injustice is history, and not of the present.

    Americans have long worked hard towards equality, realizing that a nation cannot truly call itself civilized if all of its citizens don’t enjoy the same fundamental rights, liberties, courtesies, and considerations, and their efforts have produced tangible results. For example, an education is available to any child in America, an education at whatever level that child may desire. That’s something that took a number of generations to put together, and should serve as a testament to the American people’s will to give all a chance at a decent life.

    Whatever problems still exist along the lines of racial discordance are purely in the minds of individuals. The children born tomorrow should not be taught the legacy of the oppressed and the oppressors, they should be taught that we, as did everybody else in the world, once knew the unsavory side of human nature, but that we fought hard against it, and put an end to it, so that we could become a more civilized and advanced society. Children should then be taught about all the great things that America has to offer them and of how they might avail themselves of that opportunity.

ibre Baskerville is a classic font with a modern twist. It's easy to read on screens of every shape and size, and perfect for long blocks of text.

A friend of mine once told me that there are no new stories, that they have all already been told, and that they are merely retold again and again using different words and from a different perspective. I found her statement to be unsettling, for if humanity is not creating new stories, then perhaps, we have ceased to evolve.

    And so, as lofty a goal as it may seem, I set out to tell a new story, and wrote a strange tale which utilizes the fundamentals of human nature as its personal playground. 'An Unlikely Messiah' is its title, and the first two chapters are available to read by clicking the blog link.

    The book is dedicated to thought, and so thought it attempts to evoke, with words pulled as threads from humanity’s spirit, it presents side by side events depraved and ugly but also events compassionate and beautiful. Those threads are left to flutter about freely though, for they are not mine to weave into some sort of tapestry, they are but raw material for the reader to make of them what they will.

    I wrote ‘An Unlikely Messiah’ to be entertaining, because a story must first be that before it can be anything else, but I had a hope while I wrote the book, I hoped it could serve as a sort of a primer, an initial foray into experiencing thought without bias. I’ll not say here how I thought a fictional tale could induce such a state in a person, as that would defeat its purpose, but I did hope that if one were to read the book, they might then be open to thoughts about humanity’s trial that are somewhat different. ‘An Unlikely Messiah’ is available at Amazon, and now, on to other things.

 

This will be a collection of essays that I continually add to, so if you enjoy what you read, check back now and then for new material. I’ll write about the things that are important to the American people, but that are also applicable to all people, because after all, we are all human.

    We seem to live in chaotic times, a time of divisiveness and disillusionment, that is a problem, and although to me it is a problem almost laughably simple in its resolution, it is one which may not be addressed until something else has been taken care of. And so, I present to you my opening essay,

 

It Wasn’t White People

 

It wasn’t white people that enslaved black people, nor was it white people that subjugated American Indians. Sure, the people responsible for those injustices were of a light complexion, but the bottom line is that they were only people doing what people do. It is a sad fact of human nature that people are only too willing to subject other people to whatever horrors they deem necessary to get what they want. Slavery, subjugation, even genocide have been common practices throughout history, and all cultures, or at least factions of all cultures, have been guilty of them. Long before humans became capable of far ranging travel, white people preyed on white people in Europe, Africans preyed on Africans, peoples native to North America preyed on each other, and the list could go on to cover every ethnic group on the planet.

    If in history, there had never been any ethnic groups, if everybody had been of the same ethnicity, either all white, all black, all indigenous Americans, all Asian, all Pacific Islander, all whatever, history would still read the same, it would chronicle a human history of slavery, subjugation, and genocide. Know too, that in America, such injustice is history, and not of the present.

    Americans have long worked hard towards equality, realizing that a nation cannot truly call itself civilized if all of its citizens don’t enjoy the same fundamental rights, liberties, courtesies, and considerations, and their efforts have produced tangible results. For example, an education is available to any child in America, an education at whatever level that child may desire. That’s something that took a number of generations to put together, and should serve as a testament to the American people’s will to give all a chance at a decent life.

    Whatever problems still exist along the lines of racial discordance are purely in the minds of individuals. The children born tomorrow should not be taught the legacy of the oppressed and the oppressors, they should be taught that we, as did everybody else in the world, once knew an unsavory side of human nature, but that we also fought hard against it, and put an end to it, so that we could become a more civilized and advanced society. Children should then be taught that they should heed our past, but they should not be burdened by it, because the past isn't for them to own, though the future is.

Thought Ownership

An Unlikely Messiah is a tale of fiction, though it is also a tale which has real world implications, as it is an exercise in thought, and all things human begin with a thought. The book presents rather odd scenarios, some ugly, some beautiful, for use as fuel in the formation of free thought, thought that is untainted by preconceived notions or bias, thought that is entirely original to its owner.

    Most people don’t exercise free thought, most people only think that their thoughts are their own, but actually, their thoughts are influenced, at least to some degree, by whatever the norm is for the societal faction they most identify with.

    I don’t make that statement derogatorily, because it was only half a dozen years past, that I stumbled across the practice of thought without bias myself. I had at that time the opportunity to attend the performance of many stage plays, which a play is just a story, like a book or a film, and all stories have something in common. There is of course, the story itself, but they also have more meaning to them than that which appears on the surface, meaning written into them by the author either intentionally or subconsciously. It became enjoyable for me to try and determine the playwright’s intent, but then I came across a play that for me, was a brick wall.

   The plays title was ‘Angels in America’, by Tony Kushner. A friend of mine who teaches the Theatre Arts at the high school level had entered an adaptation of the play in a statewide competition, and so I found a copy of the script to read to see what the play was about. I discovered that the play’s cast of characters were predominately homosexual males and that the AIDS epidemic of the early 1980s was a central theme. Being straight, I wondered if some sort of bias within myself might prevent me from immersing myself in the script, and I was right.

    I read it through the first time and could not decipher the playwright's intent, or even decide if the play had any intended meaning at all, but I knew my friend would not be frivolous in her choice of contest material, and I wanted to know what it was she saw in the play, so I read the script through again, only that time I attempted to free myself of all bias and prejudice, and still, there was nothing.

    I decided to read the script a third time, but to this time free my mind from all prejudices and biases, as if I were some sort of being from another realm not encumbered by such things, and, it worked! I found a meaning to the play which struck me as quite beautiful. I then thought to myself, what if I approached all social issues and especially other people unencumbered by preconceived prejudices and biases, and really thought about the issues I hear about, and really listened to the people I meet, what would happen?

    Well, I’ll tell you what, it’s been a liberating experience! When I consider politics, religion, social issues, or social conflict, my consideration begins as if the subject were entirely new to me, I don’t let past experience or popular opinion affect my thought processes, I then assimilate all of the information I can on whatever subject it is that I’m considering, and let it all stew together in my mind until I reach a conclusion. Sometimes it may take hours or days to reach a conclusion, and it can even take months or years on tougher subjects. My views may even swing back and forth on the way to a final answer, but eventually, I will have an answer, and that answer will belong to me, no one else, because I built the answer on my own, and that is a comfortable, satisfying thing.

    My interactions with other people have become quite satisfying too. I approach my conversations with other people differently than I did before, I listen. Though of course I must exercise the basics of self-preservation, and am a bit wary of the more aggressive street people begging for money, the vast majority of people I meet, I listen to without pre-conceived notions of who they might be based on appearances, apparent social status, or ethnicity. Things are a bit different for me now than they were before, when people sense that I am listening to what they have to say, and am interested in hearing them, they seem to relax, and to enthusiastically enjoy talking to me, which is an immensely satisfying reward for me, to know that somebody enjoyed a few moments of their day because they happened to cross paths with me.

    There are other, personal, benefits to my having a desire to listen to other people too. For one, I am probably alive to write this today due solely to listening to another person. I’ve been writing for eight years now, which for most writers could be considered the early stages of a writing career, and though I do make a little money from the sale of my books, I still work full time to pay the bills. I currently drive a truck, I pick up freshly harvested oysters off of boats working the bays of South Texas, I then take them to a packaging facility, and then I distribute the packaged products to seafood wholesalers from the US/Mexican border on up to Houston.

    Much of the time I’m on the road during the early morning hours, and recently one morning, a man pulled up alongside at me at a stoplight, obviously enraged. He began to scream at me, accusing me of cutting him off. My initial reaction, unfortunately, was anger, for I am a man and will not have another man yelling at me. So, I placed my hand on the truck’s door handle, my intention being to get out of the truck and confront the angry man. Before I did though, I remembered that the truck was in gear, so I went to put it in neutral and set the brakes, while I was doing that, the man continued to yell, accusing me of a willingness to cut anybody off, and surmising that I didn’t care about anybody else, only myself. His suggestion that I was uncaring calmed me, because I do care, and so rather than getting out of the truck, I attempted to calm him, and told him to ‘chill out’. His response to that was to raise his hand up off of the passenger’s seat of his car, in which he held a very large pistol, and to then point it at me, while informing me that I was lucky he didn’t blow my f***king head off, and he then sped away into the dark.

    If I had not listened to the man, and understood that he wasn’t angered by being cut off, but hurt by my apparent lack of consideration for a stranger, which implied to him that I felt said stranger was of no value, I would have got out of the truck, confronted the man, and probably caught a bullet in the chest. So, I am alive due to my willingness to listen to another person, and another man is still free and has had the time to consider his anger and his actions, and I hope that he has found them something he doesn’t want to repeat.

PEACE...

Can peace be known by the individual, and can it be known universally? If I  were to say yes to the former, people might agree that such a thing could be possible, but if I were to say yes to the latter,I've no doubt that I would be considered incredibly naive. I will state though, that both are not only possible, but probable, if the notion of peace is carefully examined.

    My statement is not a product of viewing life through rose colored glasses, but the result of careful observation. I've observed that few people live in absolute peace, totally content with themselves, their lives, and their surroundings, and that the vast majority of people, rich or poor, live under some sort of duress.

    Duress comes in many forms, financial hardship, loved ones that are ill or enslaved by drugs and alcohol, jobs that demand all of one's time, or maybe a crappy boss, co-workers, or neighbors. Just about everybody has some factor in their life that causes them stress, for some people it's many factors. So, how is it possible for one to know peace?

    Realizing that peace is only a fractional part of our lives, that it is rarely absolute, is a good start, then from there, it's an easy thing to increase in size that fraction of our lives where we know peace.

    To work towards peace is to know peace, even with all the day to day crap that we have in our lives. A person merely needs to view everyday as an opportunity to be courteous to others, and as an opportunity to listen to others, and in those acts a person will find a satisfaction that is there with them at all times , a satisfaction that they, just in the manner that they interact with others, are promoting a more universal peace.

    There will be an incorrigible jerk here and there, but most people will be able to sense the courtesies they've been shown and will pass it on. And for the person that strives to live in a courteous manner, they will know that they cast the seeds of peace into the wind, and occasionally they will see them take root, and then, they will also know hope.

    

   

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